Last year a prophetic word was spoken over me.  The speaker’s words took root in my heart.  In the word he said that the reason for all the onslaughts were because destiny was running through my veins.  It was a beautiful word but when you do not understand the meaning of words it simply remains uttered syllables. 

But God knows when to release the spoken word and when to give it revelation.  This word was left intact until the breaking open of it would break forth the meaning.  When I learned that Destiny signified your part of the Kingdom, I re-lived the moment the word was spoken over me and anew heard the Lord say, “I tell you the truth daughter, you have a part of My Kingdom running through your veins.”  This brough a whole new perspective to my understanding.

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I listened to Kim Clement teaching on destiny and the life of Joseph.  He explained that your (future) calling is linked to what you are going through in the present.  Teaching on Joseph, Clement makes this momentous statement when he says that

Joseph lost his robe, but he never lost his character.

For a period in my life, I was holding on to my robe, tighter than anything else in my life.  I wanted material things in this world.  I wanted a house and the want turned into a love.  A love that soon became an obsession.  Funny thing is that obsession and lust walks hand in hand.  Remember Jesus speaking of the temptations and idols of this world?  Lust of the eyes, lust of the flesh & the pride of life.

I recently had to face a tough decision.  I had to finally let go of that which God asked me to place on the altar.  To sacrifice my Isaac.  I felt that letting go of my dream of owning a successful business was a loss.  Part of this process of selling off the business, in the midst of a worldwide pandemic, was settling for a lesser amount.  Another unexpected realization came when I learned that part of the sale was that I would have to retrench my employees.  Having to accept an offer well below my asking price and settling outstanding debt which due to the lock down has now increased with interest.  Adding the unexpected retrenchments to the list was just way much more than I wanted to pay. 

I sought advice, I wanted to know if there was a way around not having to pay out retrenchments.  A thought I left with my labour consultant before I hung up the phone.

But hearing that statement from Kim, the Lord spoke to me, saying “It’s better to lose your robe, than to lose your character.”

I think of the scripture where Jesus says, if someone sues you for your topcoat, why not give him your undergarments also.  I could never understand it, but if your character will be lost in looking at your undergarment, knowing you have lost your rob, also give that away.  For the things of this world means nothing if we lose our identity. 

Two years ago I opened my banking app and in my credit card was a balance that exceeded R7Million.  An amount that stayed there for over a week.  I would open my app daily to see if the money were still reflecting in my account.  One morning the bank phoned me and I though surely now they will admit to their mistake and to arrange for the funds to be reversed, but they only wanted to know where they could deliver my new bank card.  Days later, as I sat in my car, I spoke to the Lord, I was puzzled and perplexed about all the money.  “What is the meaning of this Lord?” I asked.  “You surely have my attention, Lord.”  I whispered. His answer came to me in the form of a question.  “Which is worse, physical bankruptcy or spiritual bankruptcy?”  “To be spiritually bankrupt” I immediately said.

And then the Lord was quiet.

When I got back to my office, finding some invoices on my table, I opened my online account in order to make payments.  My eyes scrolling to the usual balance, but this time the money was gone.

As I was listening to Kim, I started to realize how the robe of Joseph represented the things of this world.  Our possessions and even our prestige.  Whether Joseph held on to it or not, I believe it was forcefully taken from him.  The one thing so many musicals like to point out is Joseph and his technicolour dream coat.  As if that was the most pivotal point of his whole life.

Thinking about it, I now see how glamorous and flashing the robe was.  It was the envy of his brothers.  I started to see how the envy of others will want to strip you of your robe and how the enemy will then want to put that which was stolen from you in bright lights, even getting others to celebrate it.

The most remarkable things done by Joseph was most probably while dressed in rags in a prison chamber, but the world will most likely never admire that.

I find it interesting that after Joseph lost his robe to his brothers, that Potiphar’s wife again strips him of his robe when he flees from her advances.  The first removal of his robe let him to the pit, but this time the removal, let him to prison. 

As much as we would like to think that Joseph was demoted, well at least according to our earthly standards, in fact, this was part of his promotion.  For if he never lost his first robe, he would most probably have stayed the favorite in his family home.  And think about it, what if he never lost his robe in Potiphar’s house.  He would have stayed a slave.

But what looks like demotion and loss is often God’s way of promotion and increase. This is the mystery of His up-side-down Kingdom.  Joseph actually just undressed his temporary, to put on his destiny.  Joseph never would have been worthy of the third coat if he never wore the first two.

A prophet recently looked at me and said, these words, “When I looked at you, I saw a loss. I don’t know why but when I laid my eyes on you, I saw a loss, a void. For the enemy has long ago suggested something to you.” 

And then he continued with his prophetic word, speaking into my future.

I guess what this prophet was seeing was my technicolour dream coat… but the way I know my God, He always has more coats in His heavenly closet.

By Niki Hodgson

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